About

Tariq Ali is a writer and filmmaker. He has written more than two dozen books on world history and politics, and seven novels (translated into over a dozen languages) as well as scripts for the stage and screen. He is an editor of New Left Review and lives in London.

Contact: tariq.ali3 [at] btinternet [dot] com

Literary Agent: anurnberg [at] nurnberg [dot] co [dot] uk

Theatrical/Film Agent: tom [at] casarotto [dot] co [dot] uk

From the archive

  • Obama at War: The Brooklyn Rail interviews Tariq Ali

    April 9, 2010

    An interview with Tariq Ali by Theodore Hamm and Christian Parenti for The Brooklyn Rail, April 9, 2010

    Rail: What do you make of Gen. Stanley McChrystal’s recent observation that an “amazing” number of innocent Afghan civilians have been killed by U.S. forces? That fact is not surprising—but shouldn’t such high-level acknowledgment of it provoke real opposition to the war?

    Tariq Ali: It should but it won’t because North American and European citizens (the latter in large majorities) who oppose the war feel disempowered. In the U.S., of course, Obama promised to escalate the war, an election pledge he has carried out with a vengeance and unless directly affected—as in the days of the draft—liberal Americans don’t care that much if foreigners are being killed. McChrystal’s remarks were designed largely for consumption in Afghanistan: he was simultaneously appealing  …

  • ‘Law and order’

    May 16, 2007

    ‘Law and order’ by Tariq Ali for The Guardian, May 16, 2007

    Sixty years old this August, Pakistan has been under de facto military rule for exactly half of its life. Military leaders have usually been limited to a 10-year cycle: Ayub Khan (1958-69), Zia-ul-Haq (1977-89).

    The first was removed by a nationwide insurrection lasting three months. The second was assassinated. According to this political calendar, Pervez Musharraf still has another year and a half to go, but events happen.

    On March 9 this year, the president suspended the chief justice of the supreme court. Unlike some of his colleagues, the judge in question, Iftikhar Chaudhry, had not resigned at the time of the coup, but like previous supreme courts, had acquiesced to the bogus “doctrine of necessity” that is always used to judicially justify a military takeover.  …