Lennonisms

Tariq Ali on John Lennon’s politics and Power to the People, for The Guardian, February 2, 2010

John Lennon’s power for the people … Whether or not Lennon did regret his associations with the radical left, I still remember his beliefs—and his voice—fondly.

Maurice Hindle’s comments raise some interesting questions regarding John Lennon’s politics. For the record, it might be useful to point out that it was Lennon who rang and wanted a conversation, a year after the 1969 exchange on the Beatle’s album Revolution in the “ultra-left” Black Dwarf. We met a number of times before the interview that Robin Blackburn and I conducted for the even more “ultra-left” Red Mole.

The day after the interview he rang me and said he had enjoyed it so much that he’d written a song for the movement, which he then proceeded to sing down the line: Power to the People. The events in Derry on Bloody Sunday angered him greatly and he subsequently suggested that he wished to march on the next Troops Out demonstration on Ireland, and did so, together with Yoko Ono, wearing Red Mole T-shirts and holding the paper high. Its headline was: “For the IRA, Against British Imperialism”.’

We stayed in touch and talked to each other a great deal. He invited Blackburn and myself over when Imagine was being composed. I vividly remember him singing it at the kitchen table in Tittenhurst and then looking at us inquiringly. “The Politburo approves this one,” I joked. Later, the LP arrived and most of the songs in it were radical in the broad sense of the word (as was Working Class Hero from his previous album). Imagine, the utopian hymn, written during his most radical phase, was never repudiated and while he may have regretted some of his actions and remarks in the 1970s that song continued to represent his political hopes. read more

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