Tariq Ali in Thessaloniki and Athens

Thessaloniki Law School
28th May, 2012
7:30pm

National Technical University of Athens
29th May, 2012
7:30pm

Tariq Ali will be taking part in two discussions, in Thessaloniki and in Athens, concerning the development of international social movements in today’s world. Under the title “The Age of Extremes is back — Is the Age of Revolution coming?”, Tariq Ali will discuss potential answers to the current crisis of capitalism, and the continued importance of revolution in popular struggle, with journalist Aris Chatzistefanou and Katerina Kitidi of Debtocracy and Catastroika.

From the archive

  • ‘Thinking of Edward Said’

    December 24, 2007

    ‘Thinking of Edward Said’ by Tariq Ali for Counterpunch, December 24, 2007

    I think of Edward Said often, especially, but not only, when I read of the sordid deals in which the PLO is engaged with Israel and its US backers. I miss Edward’s impetuosity and righteous indignation. He would have had no truck with the shrivelled little Bantustans that the PLO wants to accept and would have morally destroyed the apologists for such a scheme or those intellectual fellow-travellers who think that defending the idea of a secular Palestine means remaining silent on the US-EU embargo on Hamas and who, exhausted by years of struggle and the receipt of handsome cheques from some corrupt NGO, are yearning for an accommodation with the enemy on almost any terms.

    Already in his last writings Edward Said had supported the  …

  • ’1968: The year that changed the world’

    January 5, 2008

    ‘The year that changed the world’ by Tariq Ali for The Sydney Morning Herald, January 5, 2008

    There has never been a year like it: unrest, rebellion and revolution. Tariq Ali, at the forefront of the action 40 years ago, looks at how we still live with the consequences of 1968

    After the shallow, fading Cold War decades—the middle period—of the last century, an invigorating fever gripped the world.

    Its effect was so strong that even today, 40 years later, conferences are being organised, and essays, documentaries and books are being produced to mark the event.

    The tale has been told many times and in many languages, but it refuses to go away. Why? A banal reason could simply be biology: the ’60s generation is now in its 60s and some of its members are big in publishing,  …

  • Tariq Ali: In Ankara

    June 26, 2013

    How it changes. When I was in Istanbul last April the mood was sombre. Even the most ebullient of friends were downcast. The latent hostility to the regime was always present, but the AKP’s hegemony, I was told many times, went deep. Erdo?an was a reptile, cynical but clever and not averse to quoting the odd verse from Nâz?m Hikmet, the much-loved communist poet imprisoned by Atatürk. The poet had escaped in a boat and been rescued by a Soviet tanker. ‘Can you prove you’re Hikmet,’ the captain asked him. He laughed and pointed to a poster in the captain’s cabin which had his photograph on it. He died in Moscow in 1963. His remains are still in exile.

    Talk now was of food (the exquisite wafer-thin pizzas from the Syrian border) or the delights of children produced in middle  …