Tariq Ali: Anti-Imperialist Struggles After 9/11

On October 27-28, the conference on Anti-Imperialist Struggles After 9/11 takes place in Copenhagen.

Tariq Ali will be speaking about anti-imperialist stuggles and counter attacks at 10.30-11.30 on October 27th. Other speakers include Omar Shehada and Cesar Taguba. At 16.15 on Saturday there will be a roundtable debate attended by all the speakers of the day.

For more information, visit the Internationalt Forum.

The full timetable is as follows:

Saturday:

10.00 – 10.30 Welcome

10.30 – 11.30 Tariq Ali: Antiimperialist struggles and imperialisms counterattacks worldwide after 9/11

11.30 – 11.45 Break

11.45 – 12.45 Colombia: Dolly. Antiimperialist struggle in Colombia and the region after 9/11

12.45 – 13.45 Lunch

13.45 – 14.45 Palestine: Omar Shehada: The Palestinian Liberation Struggle in the light of the War on Terror and the Arab Revolt

14.45 – 15.00 Break

15.00 – 16.00 Philippines: Cesar Taguba: The antiimperialist struggle in the Philippines and the region after 9/11

16.00 – 16.15 Break

16.15 – 17.45 Panel Debate among the four speakers: The continued anti-imperialist struggle – Questions from the floor

19.00 Dinner

21.00 – 00.00 Palestine Solidarity Festival

Music Bands (Darg Team and others) and DJ Mescal

From the archive

  • ‘Where Were They When Musharraf Sacked the Judges?’

    February 1, 2008

    ‘Where Were They When Musharraf Sacked the Judges?’ by Tariq Ali for Counterpunch, February 1, 2008

    “And when a leading Pakistani journalist at a London news conference asked a reasonable question about the security services, Mr. Musharraf implied that he was an enemy of the state. Such intimidation is especially chilling coming from a leader whose chief political rival, Benazir Bhutto, was recently assassinated. In a nation with democratic aspirations, journalists have every right to question leaders. He still doesn’t seem to get that.”

    Editorial in New York Times, February 1, 2008

    You have to hand it to the New York Times. With so much to write about they can still find time to kick General Musharraf where it doesn’t really hurt. It’s not that the sentiments expressed in the editorial are wrong. Obviously journalists should and must  …

  • Tariq Ali’s speech at the National Demonstration for Gaza on 8th August, London.

    August 13, 2014

    Here is a video of Tariq Ali’s speech at the largest UK demonstration for Gaza on 8th August, London.

  • ‘Re-colonizing Iraq’

    May 1, 2003

    ‘Re-colonizing Iraq’ by Tariq Ali for New Left Review, May-Jun 2003

    On 15 February 2003, over eight million people marched on the streets of five continents against a war that had not yet begun. This first truly global mobilization—unprecedented in size, scope or scale—sought to head off the occupation of Iraq being plotted in the Pentagon. The turnout in Western Europe broke all records: three million in Rome, two million in Spain, a million and a half in London, half a million in Berlin, over a hundred thousand in Paris, Brussels and Athens. In Istanbul, where the local authorities vetoed a protest march in the name of ‘national security’, the peace movement called a press conference to denounce the ban—to which ten thousand ‘journalists’ turned up. In the United States there were mass demonstrations in New York, San  …

  • Tariq Ali’s speech at the National Demonstration for Gaza on 8th August, London.

    August 13, 2014

    Here is a video of Tariq Ali’s speech at the largest UK demonstration for Gaza on 8th August, London.

  • ‘What happened next? Student protests’

    January 4, 2011

    ‘What happened next? Student protests’ by Tariq Ali for the Guardian, December 27 2010

    A friend in France, watching the London student demos on an English website, emails “. . . unlike France, there’s no tribal, institutionalised memory of struggle where you are marching. Does that make this moment in Britain more fiery and unpredictable? I thought, watching the website, that maybe it might.” There’s no memory of revolution in modern Britain, but there is a historical memory of what the students did in 1968, a memory kept alive by images, songs and books and there is the memory of the anti-poll tax rebellion that did for Thatcher.

    Mixing old wines with new (Château Thatcher 1979, with the 1997 Nouveau Blair or the plastic-bottled Cameron-Clegg 2010) is always a mistake. Wisdoms old and young, however, mix admirably well. That is  …