Tariq Ali: ‘The Americas and Us’ at the Salone dell’Editoria Sociale

Tariq Ali will be taking part in the fourth edition of the Salone dell’Editoria Sociale in Rome between the 18th-21st of October 2012. The new edition is entitled ‘The Americas and Us’ . Taking place only a few days before the American presidential elections, it serves as an occasion to reflect on what is happening in the country, but especially in the “Americas” of the South and the many cultural and economic contradictions and social policies that animate them.

The event will also focus on the particular relationship between Italy and the USA.

For more information visit the Salone dell’Editoria Sociale website

(Website in Italian)

From the archive

  • ‘A life in writing: Tariq Ali’

    May 8, 2010

    Tariq Ali profiled by James Campbell for the Guardian to celebrate the launch of Night of the Golden Butterfly, May 8, 2010

    In photographs and news footage of political demonstrations of the 1960s, Tariq Ali is unmistakeable: the thick black hair and thatchy moustache; the clenched fist and characteristic surge to the foreground amid a sea of fair faces. Almost immediately on coming down from Oxford in 1966, Ali began to agitate for a workers’ uprising—not just in Britain but across the world. His book 1968 and After: Inside the Revolution (1978) stressed “the key importance of the working class as the only agency of social change”. His hero was Che Guevara. Meeting Malcolm X at an Oxford Union debate in 1964, he was pleased to discover that Malcolm was “a great admirer of Cuba and  …

  • Tariq Ali’s speech at the National Demonstration for Gaza on 8th August, London.

    August 13, 2014

    Here is a video of Tariq Ali’s speech at the largest UK demonstration for Gaza on 8th August, London.

  • On Intervening in Syria

    August 29, 2013

    The aim of the ‘limited war’ as set out by the United States and its European vassals is simple. The Syrian regime was slowly re-establishing its control over the country against the opposition armed by the West and its tributary states in the region (Saudi Arabia and Qatar). This situation required correction. The opposition in this depressing civil war needed to be strengthened militarily and psychologically.

    Since Obama had said chemical weapons were the ‘red line’, the weapons were bound to come into play. Cui prodest? as the Romans used to inquire. Who profits? Clearly, not the Syrian regime.

    Several weeks ago, two journalists from Le Monde had already discovered chemical weapons. The question is: if they were used, who used them? The Obama administration and its camp followers would like us to believe that Assad permitted UN chemical weapons  …