Tariq Ali: ‘The Americas and Us’ at the Salone dell’Editoria Sociale

Tariq Ali will be taking part in the fourth edition of the Salone dell’Editoria Sociale in Rome between the 18th-21st of October 2012. The new edition is entitled ‘The Americas and Us’ . Taking place only a few days before the American presidential elections, it serves as an occasion to reflect on what is happening in the country, but especially in the “Americas” of the South and the many cultural and economic contradictions and social policies that animate them.

The event will also focus on the particular relationship between Italy and the USA.

For more information visit the Salone dell’Editoria Sociale website

(Website in Italian)

From the archive

  • ‘Shimmering Prose against the Clash of Civilisations’

    September 7, 2011

    Night of the Golden Butterfly reviewed by Claudia Kramatschek for Qantara, June 10, 2011

    Since 9/11 at the latest, every fable on the state of our world appears to follow a formula that is as cheap as it is simplifying: The dominant rhetorical model is that of a clash of civilisations, depicting one side as enlightened and therefore per se in the right, and the other as backward and caught up in the constant agony of crisis and terror.

    The western media – and if nothing else the journalist and novelist Tariq Ali, who was born in Pakistan in 1943 and emigrated to London in 1963 owing to his political activities, also makes this clear in his new novel – add their own model to the mix, with the result that the word Islam automatically makes people think  …

  • ‘Pakistan: the Aftermath’

    December 31, 2007

    ‘Pakistan: the Aftermath’ by Tariq Ali for Counterpunch, December 31, 2007

    “Arranged marriages can be a messy business. Designed principally as a means of accumulating wealth, circumventing undesirable flirtations or transcending clandestine love affairs, they often don’t work. Where both parties are known to loathe each other, only a rash parent, desensitised by the thought of short-term gain, will continue with the process knowing full well that it will end in misery and possibly violence. That this is equally true in political life became clear in the recent attempt by Washington to tie Benazir Bhutto to Pervez Musharraf. The single, strong parent in this case was a desperate state department–with John Negroponte as the ghoulish go-between and Gordon Brown as the blushing bridesmaid—fearful that if it did not push this through both parties might soon be too old  …

  • A New York Times review of Bush in Babylon

    January 25, 2004

    Bush in Babylon reviewed by Serge Schmemann for The New York Times Book Review, January 25, 2004

    “An often compelling insider’s perspective … with some valuable insights into the sensitivities that explain why the occupying coalition in Iraq is not being treated as a savior.”

    It is difficult to believe that George W. Bush has been in the White House for only three years. It seems ages now that we have been living in a new world, in which his administration is closely identified with new passions, new fears, new enemies. Sept. 11, of course, is the dominant reason; it has effectively divided our life into a ”before” and an ”after,” pushing the 20th century with its hot and cold wars, its thickets of nuclear missiles and its arguments into a foggy past. George H. W.  …