Street-Fighting Years: An Autobiography of the Sixties

Published by Verso, 2005

A new edition of Tariq Ali’s memoirs, featuring the John Lennon/Yoko Ono interview ‘Power to the People’ and an important new introduction.

In Street-Fighting Years Tariq Ali revisits his formative years as a young radical. It is a story that takes us from Paris and Prague to Hanoi and Bolivia, meeting such figures as Malcolm X, Bertrand Russell, Marlon Brando, Henry Kissinger, and Mick Jagger along the way. In vivid detail, Ali captures the mood and energy of those years as he tracks the growing significance of the nascent protest movement.

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From the archive

  • Stone, Ali, and Weisbrot respond to attack from the New York Times’ Larry Rohter

    July 2, 2010

    The following letter was sent to The New York Times by Tariq Ali, Oliver Stone and Mark Weisbrot in response to a grossly distorted account of their new film ‘South of the Border‘by Larry Rohter, a one time backer of the 2002 coup attempt.

    Larry Rohter attacks our film, “South of the Border,” for “mistakes, misstatements and missing details.”  But a close examination of the details reveals that the mistakes, misstatements, and missing details are his own, and that the film is factually accurate. We will document this for each one of his attacks. We then show that there is evidence of animus and conflict of interest, in his attempt to discredit the film. Finally, we ask that you consider the many factual errors in Rohter’s attacks, outlined below, and the pervasive evidence of animus and conflict  …

  • ‘A tragedy born of military despotism and anarchy’

    December 28, 2007

    ‘A tragedy born of military despotism and anarchy’ by Tariq Ali for The Guardian, December 28, 2007

    The assassination of Benazir Bhutto heaps despair upon Pakistan. Now her party must be democratically rebuilt

    Even those of us sharply critical of Benazir Bhutto’s behaviour and policies – both while she was in office and more recently – are stunned and angered by her death. Indignation and fear stalk the country once again.

    An odd coexistence of military despotism and anarchy created the conditions leading to her assassination in Rawalpindi yesterday. In the past, military rule was designed to preserve order—and did so for a few years. No longer. Today it creates disorder and promotes lawlessness. How else can one explain the sacking of the chief justice and eight other judges of the country’s supreme court for attempting to hold  …