Street-Fighting Years: An Autobiography of the Sixties

Published by Verso, 2005

A new edition of Tariq Ali’s memoirs, featuring the John Lennon/Yoko Ono interview ‘Power to the People’ and an important new introduction.

In Street-Fighting Years Tariq Ali revisits his formative years as a young radical. It is a story that takes us from Paris and Prague to Hanoi and Bolivia, meeting such figures as Malcolm X, Bertrand Russell, Marlon Brando, Henry Kissinger, and Mick Jagger along the way. In vivid detail, Ali captures the mood and energy of those years as he tracks the growing significance of the nascent protest movement.

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From the archive

  • Tariq Ali speaks to Democracy Now about the European Union’s Nobel Peace Prize

    November 27, 2012

    The European Union was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize earlier this year for its historic role in uniting the continent. Committee chair Thorbjoern Jagland praised the EU for transforming Europe “from a continent of wars to a continent of peace.” The selection surprised many as it comes at a time when much of Europe is facing an economic crisis that threatens the EU’s future. Tariq Ali spoke to Democracy Now about the award and the state of the European Union.

    To see the interview visit the Democracy Now website.

  • ‘Who will reshape the Arab world: its people, or the US?’

    April 30, 2011

    ‘Who will reshape the Arab world: its people, or the US?’ by Tariq Ali for the Guardian, April 29 2011

    The patchwork political landscape of the Arab world – the client monarchies, degenerated nationalist dictatorships and the imperial petrol stations known as the Gulf states – was the outcome of an intensive experience of Anglo-French colonialism. This was followed after the second world war by a complex process of imperial transition to the United States. The result was a radical anticolonial Arab nationalism and Zionist expansionism within the wider framework of the cold war.

    When the cold war ended Washington took charge of the region, initially through local potentates then through military bases and direct occupation. Democracy never entered the frame, enabling the Israelis to boast that they alone were an oasis of light in the heart of Arab darkness. How  …