Tag Archives: Kurdistan

In Turkish Kurdistan

‘In Turkish Kurdistan’ by Tariq Ali for The London Review of Books (Diary), November 16, 2006

It was barely light in Istanbul as I stumbled into a taxi and headed for the airport to board a flight for Diyarbakir, the largest Kurdish city in eastern Turkey, not far from the Iraqi border. The plane was full, thanks to a large party of what looked like chattering students with closely shaved heads, whose nervous excitement seemed to indicate they’d never left home before. One of them took the window seat next to my interpreter. It turned out he wasn’t a student but a newly conscripted soldier, heading east for more training and his first prolonged experience of barrack-room life, perhaps even of conflict. He couldn’t have been more than 18; this was his first time on a plane. As we took off he clutched the seat in front of him and looked fearfully out of the window. During the flight he calmed down and marvelled at the views of the mountains and lakes below, but as the plane began its descent he grabbed the seat again. Our safe landing was greeted with laughter by many of the shaven-headed platoon. read more

From the archive

  • Tariq Ali interviewed by Kashif Ahmed about The Islam Quintet

    February 8, 2012

    In conversation with Kashif Ahmed, Tariq Ali discusses the themes and characters of his set of novels The Islam Quintet. In a wide-ranging interview, Ali talks about why he chose to start writing fiction, and its relation to his opinions on Middle Eastern sovereignty, attacks on Islam, the way to defend Islamic culture, and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Along the way he touches on his experiences of the left in the ‘60s and now, and what kind of political action is most effective today.

  • ‘A Tale of Two Tragedies’

    October 26, 2005

    ‘A Tale of Two Tragedies’ by Tariq Ali for The Nation, October 26, 2005

    The government figures provided the third week after Pakistan’s earthquake are probably a serious underestimate, but they indicate the scale of the catastrophe: 50,000 dead, 74,000 injured and at least 3.3 million—far more than after the tsunami—left homeless, virtually all of them in the mountains, where snow begins to fall in November. The poverty of the overwhelming majority of the victims is only too apparent. Bagh, a town north of Muzaffarabad, has virtually ceased to exist. In Islamabad a relief worker told me that “there is a stench of rotting corpses everywhere. In their midst survivors are searching for food. Local people say that 50,000 have died in this town alone. And more will follow if medicines and food are not equitably distributed.”

    The  …