Tag Archives: Nepal

‘This is no rah-rah revolt’

‘This is no rah-rah revolt’ by Tariq Ali for The Guardian, April 25, 2006

Nepalese have lost their fear of repression and are making a genuine, old-fashioned revolution

There is something refreshingly old-fashioned taking place in the Himalayan kingdom of Nepal: a genuine revolution. In recognition of this, the US has told citizens except for “essential diplomats” to leave the country, usually a good sign. Since April 6, Nepal has been paralysed by a general strike called by the political parties and backed by Maoist guerrillas. Hundreds of thousands are out on the streets—several have been shot dead and more than 200 wounded. A curfew is in force and the army has been given shoot-to-kill orders.

But the people have lost their fear and it is this that makes them invincible. If a single platoon refuses to obey orders, the Bastille will fall and the palace will be stormed. Another crowned head will fall very soon. A caretaker government will organise free elections to a constituent assembly, and this will determine the future shape of the country. read more

From the archive

  • ‘The same old racket in Iraq’

    December 13, 2003

    ‘The same old racket in Iraq’ by Tariq Ali for The Guardian, December 13, 2003

    To the victors, the spoils: Bush’s colonialism will only deepen resistance

    Iraq remains a country of unbearable suffering, the sort that only soldiers and administrators acting on behalf of states and governments are capable of inflicting on their fellow humans. It is the first country where we can begin to study the impact of a 21st-century colonisation. This takes place in an international context of globalisation and neo-liberal hegemony. If the economy at home is determined by the primacy of consumption, speculation as the main hub of economic activity and no inviolate domains of public provision, only a crazed utopian could imagine that a colonised Iraq would be any different.

    The state facilities that were so carefully targeted with bombs and shells have  …

  • ‘Victor Kiernan: Marxist historian, writer and linguist who challenged the tenets of Imperialism’

    February 20, 2009

    ‘Victor Kiernan’ by Tariq Ali for The Independent, February 20, 2009

    Victor Kiernan, professor emeritus of Modern History at Edinburgh University, was an erudite Marxist historian with wide-ranging interests that spanned virtually every continent. His passion for history and radical politics, classical languages and world literature was evenly divided.

    His interest in languages was developed at home in south Manchester. His father worked for the Manchester Ship Canal as a translator of Spanish and Portuguese and young Victor picked these up even before getting a scholarship to Manchester Grammar School, where he learnt Greek and Latin. His early love for Horace (his favourite poet) resulted in a later book. He went on to Trinity College, Cambridge where he studied History, imbibed the prevalent anti-fascist outlook and like many others joined the British Communist Party.

    Unlike some  …

  • ‘Brown’s al-Qaida blame game’

    December 14, 2008

    ‘Brown’s al-Qaida blame game’ by Tariq Ali for The Guardian, December 14, 2008

    Gordon Brown is targeting Pakistan. His claim that 75% of UK terror plots originate there is now part of a common western stance that refuses to accept any responsibility for encouraging the growth of recruits to jihadi organisations. Just as the events of Bloody Sunday helped IRA recruitment, the New Labour-supported wars in Iraq and Afghanistan play an important part in encouraging young Muslims to sacrifice their lives. The London bombings, which Brown mentioned in Pakistan, were the direct result of Labour’s foreign policy. There is near unanimity on this within the British intelligence community. Had Britain not participated in occupying two countries, there would have been no attacks and no training trips to Pakistan or elsewhere.

    The US intelligence agencies are close to agreeing  …