Tag Archives: Oliver Stone

Revolution in the Air: The Arab Spring and a World in Motion- Tariq Ali in conversation with Oliver Stone

Thursday, Oct. 27th

Doors 7:00 pm \\ Talk 7:30 pm \\ Free

Haymarket Books is pleased to present world-renowned political thinker and activist  Tariq Ali in conversation with director Oliver Stone, coauthor of Haymarket Books’ On History: Tariq Ali and Oliver Stone in Conversation and frequent contributor to The Guardian, London Review of Books, and the New Left Review.

From the revolts that have shaken the Middle East, to the Occupy Wall Street sentiment sweeping the U.S., mass movements have been born across the globe. Join us as we discuss this new resistance to the status quo, it’s challenge to empire and the dictates of capital, and radical notions of democracy and liberation born anew.

Seating: first come, first served

Victory Gardens Biograph Theater

2433 N. Lincoln, Chicago, IL

Facebook: http://on.fb.me/pIpUFH

Talk \\ Q & A \\ Booksigning \\ Bar

Made possible with generous support from the Lannan Foundation 

For more information:

www.haymarketbooks.org

www.lannanfoundation.org

On History: Tariq Ali and Oliver Stone in Coversation

on-history_website_bookpage

Published by Haymarket Books, 2011

In working together on two challenging new documentaries—South of the Border and the forthcoming 13-part, 13-hour Untold History of the United States series for Showtime—filmmaker Oliver Stone engaged with author and filmmaker Tariq Ali in a probing, hard-hitting conversation on the politics of history. Their dialogue brings to light a number of forgotten—or deliberately buried—episodes of American history, from the U.S. intervention against the Russian Revolution, to the dynamic radicalism of the Wobblies, how Henry Wallace’s nomination for the vice-presidency was deliberately thwarted by Democratic Party machine insiders, to the ongoing close connections between various U.S. presidents and the Saudi royal family. For Stone and Ali—two of our most insightful observers on history and popular culture—no topic is sacred, no orthodoxy goes unchallenged.

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From the archive

  • ‘The Terror Trail’

    May 20, 2004

    ‘The Terror Trail’ by Tariq Ali for The London Review of Books, May 20, 2004

    Most of those killed during the first two years of the ‘war on terror’ have already been forgotten. An exception is Daniel Pearl, the South Asia bureau chief of the Wall Street Journal, who, early in 2002, was lured to a fashionable restaurant in Karachi, kidnapped and then executed by his captors. A video showing Pearl’s throat being slit was distributed to the Western media and a gruesome clip was shown on CBS news.

    Invited to the White House to receive condolences from the president-at-war, his secretary of state and his national security adviser, Mariane Pearl told them in some detail how the United States was seen abroad and then, ‘just for the hell of it’, added that ‘my mother was born in  …

  • Interview: ‘On Balkanisation’

    October 19, 2007

    ‘Neoliberalism and Protectorate States in the post-Yugoslav Balkans’, an interview with Tariq Ali by Global Balkans Network (posted on  ZNet), October 5, 2007

    Global Balkans: It is rather fortuitous that today is the 5th of October 2007, 7 years since the so-called October 5th revolution in Serbia when Slobodan Milosevic was overthrown. The post-intervention period since October 5th is known as the “tranzicija” or “transition” in Serbia. What we are witnessing now is an accelerated privatization program, mass unemployment, massive impoverishment following upon ten years of war, the highest number of refugees and internally displaced people in Europe, and a lot of promises of a better future through privatization and so on. I wanted to ask you what your perspective on transition in such post-intervention contexts is. How do you see this?

    Tariq Ali: Well, I mean the  …

  • The Faces of Maoism

    November 28, 2013

    The recent Monty Python revival has come with a bizarre reminder from south London that once, long ago, there were a few tiny Maoist groups in Britain who used language that could have been cribbed from Life of Brian.

    Aravindan Balakrishnan, 73, and his 67-year-old wife, Chanda – arrested last week on suspicion of holding three women as slaves in a flat for 30 years – were leaders of a tiny sect of 25 members known as the Workers’ Institute of Marxism-Leninism-Mao Zedong Thought, invisible to the left at large. This sect had split from its father organisation, the Communist party of England (Marxist-Leninist), which itself had less than a hundred followers. The Maoists’ antics were rivalled by a number of Trotskyist sects, smaller and larger, whose implosion often involved the mistreatment of women, and the story is by no  …