Tag Archives: Oliver Stone

Revolution in the Air: The Arab Spring and a World in Motion- Tariq Ali in conversation with Oliver Stone

Thursday, Oct. 27th

Doors 7:00 pm \\ Talk 7:30 pm \\ Free

Haymarket Books is pleased to present world-renowned political thinker and activist  Tariq Ali in conversation with director Oliver Stone, coauthor of Haymarket Books’ On History: Tariq Ali and Oliver Stone in Conversation and frequent contributor to The Guardian, London Review of Books, and the New Left Review.

From the revolts that have shaken the Middle East, to the Occupy Wall Street sentiment sweeping the U.S., mass movements have been born across the globe. Join us as we discuss this new resistance to the status quo, it’s challenge to empire and the dictates of capital, and radical notions of democracy and liberation born anew.

Seating: first come, first served

Victory Gardens Biograph Theater

2433 N. Lincoln, Chicago, IL

Facebook: http://on.fb.me/pIpUFH

Talk \\ Q & A \\ Booksigning \\ Bar

Made possible with generous support from the Lannan Foundation 

For more information:

www.haymarketbooks.org

www.lannanfoundation.org

On History: Tariq Ali and Oliver Stone in Coversation

on-history_website_bookpage

Published by Haymarket Books, 2011

In working together on two challenging new documentaries—South of the Border and the forthcoming 13-part, 13-hour Untold History of the United States series for Showtime—filmmaker Oliver Stone engaged with author and filmmaker Tariq Ali in a probing, hard-hitting conversation on the politics of history. Their dialogue brings to light a number of forgotten—or deliberately buried—episodes of American history, from the U.S. intervention against the Russian Revolution, to the dynamic radicalism of the Wobblies, how Henry Wallace’s nomination for the vice-presidency was deliberately thwarted by Democratic Party machine insiders, to the ongoing close connections between various U.S. presidents and the Saudi royal family. For Stone and Ali—two of our most insightful observers on history and popular culture—no topic is sacred, no orthodoxy goes unchallenged.

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From the archive

  • A Review of The Book of Saladin

    November 11, 2008

    The Book of Saladin reviewed by Vinod Joseph in Epic India, November 11, 2008

    In The Book Of Saladin, Tariq Ali goes back a few centuries from his first book, Shadows Of The Pomegranate Tree. This second novel in Tariq Ali’s Islam Quintet is set in the 12th Century and is narrated by Ibn Yakub, a Jewish scribe retained by Saladin to pen his memoirs.

    As the name suggests, The Book Of Saladin revolves around Saladin, the founder of the Ayyubid dynasty and the Sultan of Egypt and Syria. As most people know, Saladin’s biggest achievement was the recapture of Jerusalem from the Crusaders and its defense against subsequent invasions. Tariq Ali has done an excellent job in portraying Saladin’s character. Saladin is not your average, run-of-the-mill brave King who dashes off into danger  …

  • ‘Imperialism and democracy don’t mix’

    January 1, 2008

    ‘Imperialism and democracy don’t mix’, an interview with International Socialist Review, Jan-Feb 2008

    What role is the U.S. trying to play since 9/11 in Pakistan?

    Musharraf has succeeded in isolating himself from the population, including from sections of the elite, because he’s played his cards very badly. When he came in—like all these military rulers who run countries—he pledged a whole set of reforms. He was the first Pakistani military dictator who didn’t censor the press or ban political parties and trade unions. He said all that will carry on as before, which is unusual.

    In fact, in the first years of his rule the media flourished. It was much freer than it had been even under civilian governments. A whole number of television stations sprang up, which are still in operation. This is one of the ironies  …

  • International Viewpoint reviews Rough Music

    March 1, 2006

    Rough Music reviewed by Fred LePlat for International Viewpoint, March 2006.

    Tariq Ali’s new short (100 pages) polemical book against New Labour is a must for every socialist. The book was written over the summer, so it is up to date with analysis on the “July days”, the shooting of Jean Charles de Menezes, and the attacks on civil liberties.

    The actions and words of Blair in his un-ending war against terrorism are scrutinised with a forensic approach, and the hypocrisy the prime minister is laid bare with acerbic wit.

    Probably the most interesting part of the book is the description of the unfolding coup by Blair and Campbell against Greg Dyke and the BBC. If virtually all the newspapers supported uncritically Blair’s drive for war, the BBC felt it had to follow the unfolding events  …